Mar
16
9:00 AM09:00

Committee on the Status of Women Presents… (Angela Wyatt)

Description of Lecture: Abstract: In 2018, the North American Saxophone Alliance launched an important initiative. The Committee on the Status of Women was formed within the larger NASA membership in efforts to create awareness of the intersectional aspects of those within our organization. The intent of this committee may be best represented in a question - how might we best work together to both acknowledge and grow the sphere of influence of our diverse membership? During this North American Saxophone Alliance Regional presentation, we will communicate our mission and vision statements, short and long term goals, organizational structure, and details on the committee's mentoring program. We will also include time for interaction and feedback among attendees. Justification: The Committee on the Status of Women has the potential to strengthen the North American Saxophone Alliance by bringing sharp focus to important issues that impact women within our professional organization. At the heart of the Committee's contribution is a commitment to providing opportunities for the women of NASA to seek mentoring from highly accomplished professionals within the membership. The fact remains that genuine, systemic equality for women within most organizations is still unrealized. If the answer to more than one of the following questions is “Yes,” forming a women’s committee is likely an effective way to achieve long-unrealized goals: Is there a need to encourage more women to become active in NASA? Should the organization be addressing certain issues that it is not (pay equity, sexual harassment, unequal access to performance opportunities)? Are women underrepresented in field leadership positions? Do you see a need for training like public speaking, running a meeting, or mentoring potential new female leadership? Mobilizing and organizing women to champion their interests—and ultimately, the advancement of NASA--is an effective way to hasten change.

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Mar
16
3:00 PM15:00

Pete Whitman - Bridging the Study of Jazz and Classical Saxophone

This will be an interactive presentation comparing approaches taken in the performance and study of jazz and classical music on the saxophone. The presenter hopes to bust the myth that playing either style well means excluding the study of the other. What do these styles have in common?What are the perceived differences?What are the benefits of studying either style?How would a jazz saxophonist benefit from the study of classical saxophone?How would a classical saxophonist benefit from the study of study jazz saxophone?Suggestions for equipment to facilitate performance of both styles.

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Mar
17
to Mar 18

Andrew Janak Tracking Wayne’s Musical Footprint: An Analysis and Comparison of “Footprints” Performed by Miles Davis’ Second Great Quintet and Wayne Shorter’s Quartet

Miles Davis referred to Wayne Shorter as the “intellectual musical catalyst” for his Second Great Quintet with his compositions/arrangements and “Footprints,” while at first glance is a seemingly simple 12-bar blues, is certainly an intellectual piece. The composition itself is malleable to different approaches as two recordings, recorded eight months apart, vary from the rhythmically and harmonically ambiguous take on Miles Smiles to the grooving modal version on Adam’s Apple. On each track Shorter’s musical personality shines through, whether in the polyrhythmic superimposition of his lines or the blues-influenced playing coming out of his hard bop background with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. These vastly different skill sets are what made him the perfect fit for Miles Davis’s Second Quintet, as he was connected to the tradition that came before him but also was a forward thinking improviser/composer and willing to take risks. Keith Waters noted that all the members of the Quintet “exhibited a deft ability to merge traditional with avant-garde approaches to improvisation” and according to Herbie Hancock the group strived for a sense of “controlled freedom.” However paradoxical that phrase may be, I believe it aptly describe the Quintet’s performance on “Footprints” and what sets it apart from the Wayne Shorter Quartet’s version. From the many metric modulations implied by Tony Williams’s drumming to Herbie Hancock’s purposeful lack of comping at certain harmonic points, the Second Quintet never altogether abandons the form of Shorter’s composition, but harmony and rhythm are pushed to the edge. Through the transcription of Wayne Shorter’s improvised solos and two different performances of “Footprints”, this paper examines Shorter’s improvisational/compositional style and dives into the rhythmic and harmonic techniques that gave Miles Davis’ Second Great Quintet its signature sound. Also problems with published lead sheets of “Footprints” are addressed and compared to the respective performances on Miles Smiles and Adam’s Apple.

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